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Media and Telecoms 2018 & Beyond conference

On the 8 March 2018 Enders Analysis co-hosted the annual Media & Telecoms 2018 & Beyond conference with Deloitte and sponsored by Barclays, Linklaters and Moelis & Company.

With the conference taking place on International Women’s Day it was particularly poignant to see a 50/50 gender balance on the line up. Chaired once again by David Abraham and with a stellar speaker line up, this conference was a highly informative and stimulating day. Videos of the presentations are available on the conference website.

Women at Work 2018

To celebrate International Women's Day on 8 March 2018 in the centenary of the partial suffrage, Women at Work 2018 promotes the goals of professional women in the UK 

Women at Work 2018

Public Policy

To download any of our reports on public policy please click on the links below:

Brexit risks for the creative industries

Trade policy path to Brexit for the UK

Public Service Broadcasting

Enders Analysis is a firm believer in strong public service broadcasting which boosts the entire UK creative industry and is consumed by almost everyone. We have published a report on Channel 4 relocation.  To download this report please click on the link below:

Channel 4: relocation and dislocation 

 

Latest reports More

  • Amazon
  • BBC
  • BT
  • Freesat
  • Freeview
  • Netflix
  • Sky
  • TalkTalk
  • Virgin Media
  • Media
  • TV
  • UK Media

Despite significant changes in people’s video viewing habits over the last few years, the TV platform landscape has appeared to reach an equilibrium

We expect pay-TV to retain its utility status for most existing customers. At the margins, movement from Sky and Virgin Media to free-to-air or pay-lite services will be mitigated by population growth

The excitable growth phases for Netflix and Amazon are likely to be over, but they have carved out prominent positions in the market. Meanwhile, the uncomplicated allure of free TV remains strong for half the UK

  • Bertelsmann
  • Media
  • Telecoms
  • TV

This third edition of Europe's Creative Hubs, produced on behalf of Bertelsmann, highlights the challenges of the digital age for enterprises of the creative industries of France, Germany and the UK from new consumer behaviours and the advent of new competitors and new forms of competition for users and customers from tech giants, Amazon, Facebook, Google and Netflix. The report calls upon policymakers in Europe to ensure a level playing field for traditional media in the key areas of taxation, competition law, privacy and data protection, highlighting the interaction of these three in the market for online advertising.
 

​Some key takeaways from the report:

  • The creative industries are of key social and economic importance.  Enterprises of the sector produce, publish and distribute news, magazines and books, music and audio-visual works, games, and the sector includes agencies providing advertising and marketing services. The creative industries in France, Germany and the UK generated a combined total GVA of €161 billion in 2015, the last year of available data. This value was created by the activity of 453,000 "employer" enterprises and their staff of 2.2 million, and excludes the activity of freelancers and micro-enterprises, a characteristic feature of the sector 
  • The UK is the top creative hub in Europe, with an estimated €1,164 in GVA per head in 2015, compared to €641 and €501 per head in Germany and France respectively. Reasons include the UK’s earlier recovery from the 2008-09 recession, relatively high domestic consumer expenditure on recreational and cultural services, and the strength of exports of English-language AV and advertising products.  This relatively robust performance in the UK highlights the risks of Brexit to the creative industries from the possible loss of regulated market access for AV products and the possible end of free movement of talent and service providers
  • France, Germany and the UK share many common trends since 2010. The most important is that online display advertising is insufficiently productive to fund professionally produced news, threatening the sustainability of journalism, the bedrock of democracy. Publishers cannot rival the data-rich advertising propositions of each of Facebook and Google, and regulatory change further threatens to skew the playing field
  • Apple
  • Facebook
  • Google
  • HTC
  • Samsung
  • Internet
  • Media
  • Technology
  • Telecoms
  • TV

Yet another annual hype cycle in 2018 can’t hide a tepid consumer appetite for all VR platforms and heavy weather for the industry as a whole

The launch of Oculus GO, a standalone device at an attractive price, is a milestone for VR; nevertheless, even Facebook remains worried about reach and the state of the industry

Mobile AR is still a strategic focus for Google and Apple, producing diverse applications instead of just games, but new headsets from Microsoft and Magic Leap which promise advanced MR experiences have no launch dates

  • Channel 4
  • ITV
  • Sky
  • Media
  • Telecoms

The workings of the TV advertising market are a mystery to most. Overlaying an arcane ‘share of broadcast spend’ trading mechanism is regulation in the form of CRR, which has prevented anti-competitive activity by ITV since 2003

CRR will protect advertisers ‘for as long as needed’. Most advertisers we canvassed believe it should stay in place, but the sell-side and auditors say CRR has passed its ‘Best before’ date and is heading towards its ‘Use by’ date

We propose a review of CRR by the Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) to determine whether it is now helping or hindering the TV advertising ecosystem to become fit-for-purpose for the digital age

  • Amazon
  • Apple
  • BBC
  • Channel 4
  • Facebook
  • Freeview
  • Google
  • ITV
  • Netflix
  • Samsung
  • YouTube
  • Media
  • Telecoms

The TV, the main screen in the house, is rapidly becoming connected to the internet, opening a new front in the battle for people's attention

Tech players, pay-TV operators, and manufacturers are all aiming to control the user interface, ad delivery and data collection, leaving incumbent broadcaster interests less well represented

To protect their position, and the principles of public service broadcasting, broadcasters will have to work with each other at home and in Europe to leverage their content and social importance

  • Sky
  • Sky Italia
  • Media
  • Telecoms

Italy’s top football league awarded Sky the broadcasting rights to seven games per week from August 2018 until May 2021 for €780 million per year, up €208 million. UK-based Perform will carry three games for €193 million. Mediaset exits the market, freeing Sky from price competition

Besides Serie A, Sky added Mediaset’s Hollywood series and films to its content line up in May and will include the Champions League from August. We expect costs to rise by up to €500 million per year, which could be recouped by cuts in content and by recruiting Mediaset subscribers, notably on Sky’s new DTT feed

The best model for Perform would be to wholesale its new DAZN service to Sky, but even if a deal is found we doubt it could break even within the rights cycle